Organism sex

It is not intended to define or explain every technical term that is used in association with pesticides or pest control. A pesticide organism sex is used to kill mites and ticks, or to disrupt their growth or development. The chemical in a pesticide formulation that kills or otherwise controls a pest or a weed.

The remainder of a formulated pesticide is one or more inert ingredients. A pesticide that is used to kill or inhibit algae. A pesticide that prevents an insect or other pest from feeding. A chemical that lures pests to a trap, thereby removing them from crops, animals or stored products. A pesticide that is used to kill birds. An insecticide in which the active ingredient is a living bacterium that infects an insect pest and then kills or inhibits it.

Bacterial insecticides are not included in the Compendium. A pesticide that is used to kill or inhibit bacteria in plants or soil. A chemical that occurs naturally in an organism, or an identical substance that has been made artificially. A naturally-occurring substance that controls pests by a mechanism other than toxicity.

Examples include sex pheromones that are used as mating disrupters for insect pests, and plant extracts that are used as attractants to lure insect pests to traps or that are used as insect repellents. A chemical that deters birds from approaching or feeding on crops or stored products. A name used by a pesticide manufacturer or supplier for a formulation, and the most prominent name on product labels and in advertisements. A chemical that renders an insect infertile and thus prevents it from reproducing. Some insects that mate only once can be controlled or eradicated by releasing huge numbers of sterilised insects. A plant growth regulator that causes the leaves or other foliage to drop from a plant, usually to facilitate harvest.

An insecticide that kills insect pests by damaging their cuticle thus causing them to dehydrate, or a herbicide that promotes the drying of living plant tissues, such as unwanted plant tops. A pesticide as sold to personal and professional end users, usually a mixture of an active ingredient and several inert ingredients, and with a prominently-displayed brand name on its label. A pesticide that is used to kill fungi in plants, stored products or soil, or to inhibit their development. A pesticide that is used to kill plants, or to inhibit their growth or development. A chemical that protects crops from injury by herbicides, but does not prevent the herbicide from killing weeds. A substance that is not an active ingredient and that is included in a formulation for reasons other than pesticidal activity.

Functions of inert ingredients include diluting the pesticide, making it safer, making it more effective, making it easier to measure and mix, making it easier to apply, and making it more convenient to handle. In some countries, they are listed on the label. A chemical that lures insects to a trap, thereby removing them from crops, animals or stored products. An insecticide that works by disrupting the growth or development of an insect. A pesticide that is used to kill insects, or to disrupt their growth or development.

A chemical that deters an insect from landing on a human or an animal. A biochemical that occurs in insects and regulates their development. Can be used to control some insects by preventing larvae from developing into adults. The printed information on the packaging of a pesticide formulation that displays the brand name, provides information about the active ingredient, gives instructions for using the product, and lists additional information as required by the registration authority. An insecticide that kills the larvae of insects.