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We have no control over the content of these pages. We accept no responsibility for the content on any website which we link to, please use your own freedom while surfing the links. Reproduction in any form is prohibited. Jump to navigation Jump to search For stereotypes about the inhabitants of Africa, see Stereotypes of Africans. A comprehensive examination of the restrictions imposed upon African-Americans in the United States of America through culture is examined by art historian Guy C. Liberty Displaying the Arts and Sciences, or The Genius of America Encouraging the Emancipation of the Blacks, 1792. From the colonial era through the American Revolution ideas about African-Americans were variously used in propaganda either for or against the issue of slavery.

As a stereotypical caricature “performed by white men disguised in facial paint, minstrelsy relegated black people to sharply defined dehumanizing roles. Rice and Daniel Emmet the label of “blacks as buffoons” was created. This reproduction of a 1900 William H. West minstrel show poster, originally published by the Strobridge Litho Co. Minstrel shows portrayed and lampooned black people in stereotypical and often disparaging ways, as ignorant, lazy, buffoonish, superstitious, joyous, and musical. The best known stock character of this sort is Jim Crow, featured in innumerable stories, minstrel shows, and early films.

There are many other stock characters that are popularly known as well, like Mammy and Jezebel. These stock characters are still continuously used and referenced for a number of different reasons. The character Jim Crow was dressed in rags, battered hat and torn shoes. The actor blackened his face and hands and impersonated a very nimble and irreverently witty African American field hand who sang, “Turn about and wheel about, and do just so. And every time I turn about I Jump Jim Crow.

The Sambo stereotype gained notoriety through the 1898 children’s book The Story of Little Black Sambo by Helen Bannerman. It told the story of a boy named Sambo who outwitted a group of hungry tigers. Golliwog is a similarly enduring caricature, most often represented as a blackface doll, and dates to American children’s books of the late 19th century. The character found great favor among the whites of Great Britain and Australia as well, into the late 20th century. Portuguese word for ‘small child’ in general, it was applied especially to African-American children in the United States, then later to Australian Aboriginal children. What is known about the Mammy archetype comes from the memoirs and diaries that emerged after the Civil War with recordings and descriptions of African-American household women slaves who were considered by family members as their African-American mothers. Through these personal accounts, white slaveholders gave biased accounts of what a dominant female house slave role was.